Monday, February 28, 2005

Ban Michael Bryant...Not Specific Breeds!

Well, it seems like Michael Bryant has won with his Bill 132 and what the majority of Ontario says. It's a sad time when the voice of one fear monger can dictate to a Province. How is it that I went to a City Hall public meeting and out of all that turned out were against the breed ban with the exception of only 3 people that were for the ban.
One man stood up very cockily and announced how afraid he was as to what happened in his apartment building. He started to explain as he was leaving to come out of his apartment, there was a young boy, weighing barely 100 pounds and holding a leash with a 150 pound pit bull. The dog lundged at him, but the man used his quick judgment by running back into his apartment, he closed his remarks by stating, he didn't know the damage that the dog would have done to him otherwise.
Come on now! How believable was that? first of all, if it weighed 150 pounds, it definitely wasn't a pit, (especially since there is no such breed as a Pit Bull). My point is, it's stories like this that Michael Bryant is counting on.
Yes! There have been attacks and people have been viciously and severely maimed. My heart goes out to them and understand their anguish and outrage. But in these attacks, where were the owners? Why were these dogs not on a leash and under the owners control? I blame the owners of the dogs. They are the ones that due to their poor judgement (or lack of it) caused those attacks. Responsible ownership of ALL animals must be enforced. That will stop attacks to people and animal abuse.
Back yard breeding for profit needs to be stopped also, just as the puppy mills must be closed down. Inner breeding is nothing new in those circles and chances of getting a neurotic dog is extremely possible. That's why breeding should be left to reliable Breeders. Yes, you pay more, but isn't it worth it to get a perfectly healthy normal puppy that you know where it came from and good stock?
I'm not suggesting by any means that you don't go to your local Humane Society to adopt a pet. The Humane Society take professional care to assure you get a healthy pet and they not only screen the animal, but also the prospective adopter prior to you taking that cute little puppy home. You will be well informed about the specific pet so no surprises will develop, such as one year later that cute little pup is a small pony and eating you out of house and home. They are not only fulfilling your requirements, but also have the animals best interest in mind. Besides, the Humane Society wouldn't be so over-whelmingly brimming with unwanted pets and strays if responsible ownership was enforced.
I blame the press too. How they jump on a story if the animal involved is a pit bull. You barely heard anything regarding other breeds, yet the percentage of bites and attacks are not coming from so-called pit bulls. Those are just the ones we hear and read about in the news. It makes today's headlines.
Responsible owners do not WANT mean dogs! They want loving and gentle companions. But who does want mean dogs, people that use them for illegal personal gains. They will go as far as literally having their voice boxes removed so if someone enters their premises, the dog can attack silently with no warning given. These dogs have been bused and taught to be mean by their owners. These are the people that have Michael Bryant judging all our dogs and it shouldn't be the case. "Ban the deed, not the breed", is the slogan that is being sent out. Responsible ownership is the answer. Evenual extinction is NOT!
Here is how we stand as of today;
Final reading for proposed pit bull ban today
Monday, February 28, 2005
A provincial law aimed at banning pit bulls in Ontario receives its third and final reading today at the legislature.
Under the proposed law, current owners of the dogs would be allowed to keep them, as long as they are muzzled in public.
Those dogs would also have to be spayed or neutered, but no other pit bulls or pit bill look-alikes would be allowed in the province.
A vote on the bill is expected tomorrow.
Am I angry? YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT! It will be a sad, sad day for so many countlessly being put down or sent to labs to be used for experiments. This is not humane!
I'd like to Bill 133 Michael Bryant as a menace to society with his ill informed, narrow mindedness right out of OUR government. Ban Michael Bryant! N
ot dogs!

Tuesday, February 22, 2005

My Important Pet Family...

Introducing my pet family...past and present... Posted by Hello

* Upper left is BrandyCat. Brandy is now between 21 or 22 years old and is nearing his journey to Rainbow Bridge. He has a heart murmur and the vet said he would never make it to middle age. He was to need heart medication for the rest of his life, but Brandy is a fighter and has surpassed what I was told and hasn't been on his medication for years now.

* Middle top is Petu. I saved him from being abandoned in a blueberry patch in Northern Ontario at a year old. He was full of fleas, ear mites were making his ears bleed and he would yell, as I don't think his hearing was very good. After a visit with the vet, getting him his shots, neutered, and medication for his ears, plus a proper diet, he turned into a beautiful and loving pet. He's 10 years old now and his back paws are so big, I tell people one of his parents must have been a Jackrabbit.

* On the right top we have my baby, Shasta. She has changed my life dramatically for the best. She's a Staffordshire terrier and 2 and a half years old now. I am hoping to get her into the Dog Therapy Program to help seniors and sick kids. (If Bill 132 doesn't pass) Shasta can say, Mom.

* Bottom left is Roxbro. He passed on to Rainbow Bridge a year ago. He was my baby that never grew up. He was a white, silver shaded, chinchilla Persian and gave me 10 happy years.

* In the middle bottom is Spanky, my son's dog. He's a Pit/Pei and although by first seeing him, you might be a bit leery of him, but once you meet him, you find out he has a very friendly, comical character. Spank is 8 years old.

* At the bottom right, is Bunny. She was the kid's first puppy and grew up with them. Once they got older and left home, Bunny was my loving companion. I called her, my daughter that would never leave home. LOL Sadly, only a few years ago, she passed on to Rainbow Bridge at the age of 20. This very special picture of her was taken just the night before she passd. I tried to celebrate our last night together and tried to encouage her to eat all her favorite human foods. She wasn't able to, but she did allow me to take a very pretty picture of her and even smiled for this picture.

* (Picture not included yet) The newest member to my household is Ruby. Ruby is a ruby red (thus the name), Betta. He came to get babysat over the Christmas holidays and decided to stay. Now, he is family.

Each wonderful pet member has been a joy to my family and I. Now that I live on my own, I never feel alone with my loved pet family and the unconditional love we give to each other.

Monday, February 21, 2005


UPDATE: A whole night's stress for nothing. I phoned the doctors office the next day to get the specifics that I had tuned out. Turns out it is only a very small, 2 cm. tumour. Then, once I knew what the particulars were, I phoned my kids to have a get together over the weekend.
I found that once I explained to them, rather than over-reaction and fear, they gave me their support and encouragement. Coming clean with them was the best thing I could have done.
I've since been to the doctors after receiving more tests. It seems that the type of tumour I have is normally benign, but to be on the safe side, the doctor has me going for a follow-up with a specialist.
I feel wonderful and this has taught me a very important lesson. My kids are out on their own and young adults. They no longer need for me to shelter them as I did when they were young. Being open and honest with them brought us even closer than we already were. They suspected all along that there was a problem. Now with the openness, we are all relieved as things weren't nearly as bad as what they were already suspecting.